Jackie Parry – author


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Are Audio Books The Future?

What do you think of audio books?

A great new website has been launched for Audio Books.

Do you listen to books? For me it means I can indulge in stories while driving, sanding, painting or just trying to turn my mind off and visit somewhere else in the world while snuggled in bed.

ID-100114512 (1)

Image courtesy of imagerymajestic at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Many people have told me that audio books are the future – what do you think?

I have one audio book – “Of Foreign Build-From Corporate Girl to Sea Gypsy Woman“. Another two will follow soon “This Is It” and “A Standard Journey

Amazing Audiobooks is a great website – do take a look.

 


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Unhealthy Writing!

Writing and Middle-Aged Spread!

I sit a lot. I have to, I’m a writer.

Coupled with middle age, this is not a good recipe for a healthy life.

So in order to combat midde-aged-spread (how lovely) I have a game plan.

  1. I’ve taken up baking again. Not pastries and cakes, well not all the time. But vegetarian and healthy foods. I have a huge appetite, and eating less is just not going to happen. Here’s one of my favourite recipes.

    Red Bean Moussaka

    Red Bean Moussaka

  2. Painting! Owning a boat keeps you fit, when we move, furling ropes, climbing ladders (for locks) and handling lines keeps me fit. Plus painting is a regular task. We’re thankfully at the point where we just need to touch up our paintwork. Here’s my latest project. I love this anchor winch, it’s functional and beautiful!

    Anchor Windlass- before

    Anchor Windlass- before

    Anchor Windlass - after

    Anchor Windlass – after

If you are a writer/author or sit in an office, what are your tactics to stay fit and healthy?


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Horses, Boats, Writers, Travel, and Stories from the Heart

This is a short story on travels, boats and horses from a fellow writer and friend, Alison Alderton.

It’s very special.

To find out why you’ll have to read to the end…  Here’s Alison’s pretty barge ‘Lily’

Dutch barge Lily moored at Mustadfors

Dutch barge Lily moored at Mustadfors

What do horse shoe nails and boating have in common? by Alison Alderton

“Not a lot” I hear you reply. Well at first glance perhaps not but recently I drifted into the small town of Mustadfors on Sweden’s Dalsland Canal and made a discovery as well as a link to a friend.

The horse shoe symbol on the side of the lift bridge

The horse shoe symbol on the side of the lift bridge

On the lift-bridge by the town’s lock is a horse shoe symbol, it reflects the town’s long association with the production of horse shoe nails. In conversation with the Lock Keeper, he told how the company, which no longer works out of the town, once specialised in light weight nails. These were made from aluminium and used in the race horse industry. With a little research of my own I later discovered these are also used with shoes specially designed for trotting horses.

The entrance to the former horse shoe nail manufacturers

The entrance to the former horse shoe nail manufacturers

Mustadfors lift bridge

Mustadfors lift bridge

Mustadfors lock on the Dalslands Canal

Mustadfors lock on the Dalslands Canal

Horse-trotting has a long history in Sweden; people have competed with their horses since the 19th century and at the nearby Amal’s racetrack there are regular events from April through to September each year.

Home, 5 horses nearby and our tents

Home, 5 horses nearby and our tents

Friends
A boating friend, Jackie Parry recently published a book about her amazing adventures with five ex-trotting horses which she and her husband, Noel rescued from an unknown fate. “A Standard Journey” is an exciting read; about how they sold up and set off with their horses to hack Australia’s Bi-centennial National Trail and brings my visit to the pretty little canal-side town of Mustadfors full circle.

I am thankful for this most unusual discovery which triggered thoughts of a dear friend.

jackie p

And why is this so special?

Well, Alison’s publisher is keen for her to finish her book on her life with a rather special companion. Yes, there’s Roger, her lovely husband, but there’s also Buster the Beagle.

Boating with Buster – The life & times of a barge beagle will be a story you’ll want to read. Follow Alison here and/or here and try to be patient, it is a work in progress.

What I can promise you, knowing the ethos behind the story, is that it will be a book that will stay with you forever – I can hardly wait!

Here are more photos to whet your appetite.

And here’s our Dutch Barge (for sale) you can have a good look around here….

Rouge Corsair is for sale!

Rouge Corsair is for sale!


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Interview on WriterStory!

Addicted to travel, adventure, and writing, Jackie doesn’t sit still for long. Originally from the UK she is now an adopted Australian. She’s sailed around the world one-and-a-half times and trekked in the bush with five rescued horses for months. She has trained as a professional maritime captain and teacher. Currently she is exploring the European canals on a 1920s Dutch barge with her Australian husband, Noel. She’s written about her sailing and horse trekking escapades, and is an encourager, ‘there are far too many critics in the world already!’

  1. What inspired you to start writing?

I was first inspired when I was about nine years old – I just loved writing stories. Also, not long after that I remember starting to read adult books and feeling the rush of adrenaline, the prick of tears, the clutch of stomach laughter – all from a book!

That amazed me.

At school I loved English lessons (my friends ribbing me endlessly about being the teacher’s pet!). Then, at work, I joined the team that wrote the bi-monthly company magazine. I progressed to writing destination and technical articles for sailing magazines all over the world as I sailed around the world – to help fund the trip. It felt a natural progression to write books about what I knew – inspirational travel and living life to the full!

  1. What did you like to read when you were a girl?

Ironically, it was mostly the school books that I read. I grew up with horses and being outdoors was more important than anything.

But I enjoyed most of the books I had to read for English lessons. At junior school I could hardly wait for our weekly session of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. Later, in senior school Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck really stuck with me. I can’t say I enjoyed Shakespeare’s Macbeth, however, the story and the pictures I conjured in my head by the words (once I had worked out what they meant) were vivid and really got me thinking about how black words on white paper are so powerful.

  1. What is the greatest challenge in writing a book?

Every part is a challenge, but what struck me most was, that on completing my first book, the next challenge commences – getting it seen!

As for ‘writing’ the book – for me it is the sequential part. I tend to jump in here and there within the story when I am drafting. So, to jiggle the contents into a meaningful and true timeline is a task I don’t really enjoy. My brain jumps from subject to subject (often driving my husband nuts!) and that’s how my initial draft of the book is written!

Funnily enough, I enjoy the editing process. Working the bulk of the book into order, initially, is a lot of work – once that is done I feel great pleasure from manipulating and massaging the paragraphs.

  1. How much research do you do before writing the book?

So far my books have been about subjects I am fully acquainted with – non-fiction books (1) “A Cruisers’ AA (accumulated acumen)” a book with over 1,800 tips, tricks, and, advice on living on board a boat. (2) “Of Foreign Build – From Corporate Girl to Sea Gypsy Woman” a nine-year odyssey sailing around the world (3) “A Standard Journey – 5 horses, 2 people, and 1 tent” we adopted five horses and trained them (they trained us) as one team. We all set out into the Australian bush together for several months – an extraordinary story of 5 horses and 2 people becoming family and relying on each other. (4) “This Is It – 2 hemispheres, 2 people, and 1 boat” Our two-year escapade, buying a boat in San Francisco and sailing back across the Pacific, via Easter Island, Pitcairn, etc, to Australia.

So, I knew my subjects inside out. I am, however, planning a fiction book. The research so far has been immense. For me, the actual writing will not start until I have most of the research completed – several more weeks, maybe months to go! And then I am sure there will be more.

  1. What motivated you to write the book “This Is It: 2 hemispheres, 2 people, and 1 boat”?

It was an extraordinary adventure. We’d previously sailed around the world for almost nine years. So, one would think that a two-year voyage across the Pacific Ocean again (albeit a more southerly route), would be an easier trip.

It wasn’t.

The journey was tough but dappled with extraordinary events. I wanted to show that our life of travel (Noel and I have been travelling most of our 18 years of marriage), is not always fun! It’s okay to have difficult days. I wanted to show my theory on why some ordinary days are so difficult but extremely important.

I worked especially hard on the ending, which is a culmination of the theme throughout the book, which summarises why people do what they do – why we did what we did. What makes a good/happy/successful journey (and it isn’t about good weather and nice people!). How you have to be happy with yourself – that’s the first step in the adventure, no matter what you are doing.

I’ve received many personal letters from all over the world thanking me for highlighting the positive and negatives of a travelling life. My words are ringing true for a lot of people, who couldn’t figure out where they were going wrong, or what was tarring their experiences! I’ve helped them in a little way – so it’s been a complete success!

  1. Can you tell us more about your latest book “This Is It: 2 hemispheres, 2
    people, and 1 boat”? 

This Is It is a story to show that although journeys can be hard, they should still be appreciated – This Is It – right now, we all have to appreciate, more, what we have and make the most of it. That’s the underlying premise and from the letters I regularly receive the story is inspiring people to do what they’ve always dreamed of.

I reveal the marvellous and rarely visited destinations we sailed into (Suwarrow for instance) and how the mind plays tricks at sea, how we dealt with filling with water 2,000 miles away from the nearest land – and a couple of terrifying incidents of wild weather that tested our resolve and fortitude to the limit.

We are two ordinary people living an extraordinary life. Our story shows that anything is possible if you want it badly enough. Living on your terms is within reach and you can ‘survive’ when you make every aspect of your life an adventure – and fun – even the bad bits are important! For we all need those struggles in life because that’s what makes the good bits even better!

It’s about life and the reason we do things. What scares us silly, what makes us feel alive. Deep fears, dynamics of a close relationship – how we turned our lifestyle into our work, so we make a living doing what we love.

It features a bit about sailing, but it’s not a technical book for only those who enjoy the water. It’s a book for adventure seekers, or those who are just happy to live vicariously via others’ adventures. It’s also inspirational, an eye-opener and quite often funny! It’s a real look at life.

  1. How did you come up with the idea of writing adventure fiction genre book?

My books appear (and have been noted for) reading like fiction. But they are non-fiction. Every event in those stories happened, getting run over in Paris, sinking, pirates, whale collisions, man-eating crocodiles, working in a Barbados brothel, muggers….

Initially, I wanted to have a record of our adventures, just for Noel and I. Then my stories started taking shape and my dream of publishing a book became reality with a lot of hard work. Initially, a publisher was interested in my first two books – however, I chose independent publishing to maintain control of my life’s story. Since publishing four books, three have now been picked up by a publisher who is producing audio books for my stories. (Of Foreign Build is already available in audio).

Actually, I am still amazed at the things I’ve witnessed, the places I’ve been and how much my life changed when someone very close to me died. I wanted to show everyone that there are alternatives to the 9-5 trudge – there really is, if you really want it.

  1. Who are your favourite authors?

I read a lot of fiction. My favourite genres are thrillers and historical fiction. Favourite authors are Albert Facey who wrote A Fortunate Life, Dick Francis, Steinbeck.

Also, I have joined a wonderful FB group called We Love Memoirs (WLM). It is a group of both readers and writers – and many of the authors there are becoming firm favourites too. Anyone can join – it is one of the friendliest groups on FB.

  1. How much time do you dedicate for writing on a daily basis?

I am not that organised! I travel, almost constantly and most days are unplanned.

Noel and I currently live on a 1920s Dutch barge in France. If we are moving I maybe busy working the lines, or on the helm, in and out of locks, or just watching the world putter by at five knots. If we are in port, we maybe bike riding to the shops, keeping on top of boat maintenance or taking shelter from the rain.

Rainy days can give me time to write, but there is a compromise. Take right now for example, as I write. We thought we’d be moving today, but the rain over-night has added to the flood rains (of two days ago) to cause the canal to rise again. So we are stuck on a floating jetty in the beautiful green countryside near Ypres. It is all very nice, we have everything we need, but little power. Boats are a mini village, with their own power, water, heating etc, but our solar panels do not work very well when it is so overcast. (Actually, they work surprisingly well, but struggle with TV and two laptops and a fridge running!) We can tap away on our laptops but then, at some point, we’ll have to run the engine.

It’s a wonderful life, but with few certainties, (except adventure), which is just the way I like it.

I snatch time to write: Early in the morning, late at night – or when stuck in a port due to weather. It really is as and when for me.

If I have moments of planned days, I will try 1-2 hours per day. But that never works out! I’ve been known to write all day long.

  1. What words of wisdom would you like to give to aspiring writers?

Don’t give up. Keep going. That sounds over simplistic, but let me explain a bit more.

It’s not until you’ve tried to write a book that you have any inclination how hard it is – it is tough. Most writers start okay, then reach the stage where it becomes tricky and you need to find real resolve and fortitude to continue – most writers stop there.

Those that get over that ‘hump’, acknowledge it – work through it – go on to finish their book. Each day (if possible) work on what you can. Some days you will feel able to tackle the tough parts, other days you won’t. On those days that you can’t face the tough bits, work on something easier – a different chapter, the contents, spelling, front cover, back cover blurb, research, marketing plan – anything – as long as you are moving it forward, somehow, each day.

If you keep going, one way or another, you will get there – I promise. It is tremendously tough, even once you’ve completed your book too, but all so worth it.

Best of luck!

Author blog: www.jackieparry.com

Travel blog: www.noelandjackiesjourneys.com

Horse blog: http://helpinghandforhorses.weebly.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jackie.parry.7543

Travels: https://www.facebook.com/NoelAndJackiesJourneys

Horses: https://www.facebook.com/pages/For-the-love-of-horses/1048526295173146

Amazon Author page: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00OT9CWV8

Amazon book links

A Standard Journey: viewBook.at/astandardjourney

Of Foreign Build:  viewBook.at/OfForeignBuild

Cruisers’ AA (accumulated acumen): viewBook.at/cruisersaa

This Is It: viewBook.at/thisisit

Audio Excerpt Of Foreign Build: http://goo.gl/AnsKRr

Twitter

https://twitter.com/NandJJourneys

https://twitter.com/StandardJourney


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Audio Books – Do you like them?

Big News!

Great news arrived in the Parry house(boat)hold yesterday.

Rouge Corsair - 1920s Dutch Barge

Rouge Corsair – 1920s Dutch Barge

A few weeks back I announced that my publisher is producing This Is It – 2 hemispheres, 2 people, and 1 boat in audio format.

Lake Titicaca

Just one of the fabulous places we visited on Pyewacket – Lake Titicaca (well, I should clarify, we didn’t take the boat to the lake!)

Yesterday, I received the news that A Standard Journey – 5 horses, 2 people, and 1 tent, is also going to be in audio format too.

These things take time, finding the right professional reader and production – it has to be just right.

webpage cover header 15th feb

All my books – aside from Cruisers’ AA (accumulated acumen) (for obvious reasons!) will be available in audio format soon – Of Foreign Build – From Corporate Girl to Sea Gypsy Woman – already is!

Later this year I am sure I will have plenty of giveaways!

Do you like audio books?


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The Doctors in Ecuador

Medical Help Aboard

We still need to visit Doctors when travelling.

I had to arrange a regular check up (that is important to women) while in Ecuador.

Noel had just spent a day in the local ‘hospital’. At the end of this article there’s a short excerpt of that little escapade. By the end of that day, it was I that needed medical attention!

The town of Bahia de Caraquez

The town of Bahia de Caraquez

The Doctor I arranged to visit either sensed my unease, or was just the consummate professional – a bit of both perhaps.

We sat and chatted and he wrote background notes. His family photos were strewn around the shelves behind him.

He picked up a picture and explained he had two daughters and a wife. He then picked up the phone and dialled a number. I wondered if he was getting a nurse to assist with the examination.

‘Here, talk to my daughter,’ he suddenly said, handing me the phone. Surprised, I chatted with a complete stranger for several minutes. I don’t even remember what we talked about – but she put me at ease.

This, I realised, was the Doctor’s ploy. He understood I was a woman about to become very personal with a strange man, in a foreign country.

What followed was the most professional and clinical examination I have received anywhere in the world.

Travelling is not just about the latest tourist attraction – it is about the locals, how they live and how they interact. This is one of my precious memories – a kind-hearted, professional Doctor in Ecuador.

That pesky dinghy motor (Jackie with nephew Kieran)

That pesky dinghy motor (Jackie with nephew Kieran)

Excerpt from This Is It – 2 hemispheres, 2 people, and 1 boat

He spent four hours on a drip in the hospital, but it felt like several days to me.

Cluttered together within the cool, clinical infirmary, a dozen green rooms branched out from the grey corridor. Nurses quietly squeaked past on their soft shoes, as if little hamsters were warming their toes and squealed when trodden on. With most rooms sitting empty, Bahians must be healthy people.

Short on modern technology, the hospital didn’t accept credit cards. I needed to organise a cash payment of about one hundred dollars. Noel spent the afternoon in his air-conditioned room with TV and the rehydrating drip. I marched the fifteen minute walk back to the boat in suffocating humidity to collect Noel’s credit card to take to the bank to withdraw money.

I rarely use my card, so I had forgotten the number. I was the last one to use Noel’s card, and I had put it in a safe place. I tore the boat apart looking for his card. Then I panicked, thinking it must have been stolen. I jumped in the dinghy, trying to ignore the sweat running between my breasts and drove back to shore frantically, nursing our temperamental engine.

This sounds a simple task, but handling our large inflatable dinghy and naughty outboard motor was a battle. Starting an eight horse power outboard takes a fair amount of arm-pulling grunt. The cord needed to be yanked hard with great speed and in one movement to cause the right parts to spin. Arm muscles grew rapidly and lopsidedly. I could only pull with my right arm; my left hand hung on to the motor in an attempt to stop me flicking myself over the side in the violent manoeuvring. More problems arose as the outboard wouldn’t idle, so I had to start it with high revs and be quick enough to bring them down as the engine fired into a deafening screech.

It’s tricky to pull it all off. You need to be tied on to the boat as the current would carry you half way out to sea if you didn’t start the motor on first pull. I never started it on first go, and to whip my arm back and stay balanced with that jerky movement, while the dinghy lurched forwards and backwards due to the taut line, was a feat. After balancing in a standing position while untying the line from the fighting dinghy, you had to keep the motor going until you reached the dinghy dock.

I needed to sit farther forward to help balance the craft, but couldn’t leave the throttle; it needed constant nurturing – too fast and the bow shot in the air, and I couldn’t see where I was going; too slow and the motor would cut, causing a wild and frantic cord pulling-balancing act to save myself from being swept away out into the ocean.

If all went accordingly, as I approached the dock, I needed to time the slowing of the engine (and therefore it cutting out) at exactly the right moment – too soon and I didn’t make it to land and the whole process commenced all over again; too fast and I rammed the jetty with a red face, bounced off and began the entire process once again! Life wasn’t dull.

Safely on shore, using Skype, I cancelled Noel’s card. While waiting on the line for confirmation, I fiddled with my small camera case.

‘Okay, that’s it. I’ve cancelled Noel’s card—’ the helpful lady at the bank said.

‘Wait! Hang on! I’ve just found… Blast,’ I muttered as the line disconnected. I don’t carry a bag or wallet, but I do carry my camera in its case, which is a great place to stash a credit card temporarily!

‘Hello, hello again, I was just speaking to someone there, just a moment ago, I cancelled my husband’s card, but I’ve just found it!’ I blathered, feeling sure they’d trust me.

‘Sorry, we can’t reinstate it.’

…..  and so it went on, it actually became worse  before it got better!


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“…find something unique and special in Parched” #99cent #ebook limited time offer! #dystopian Must Read! @authorandrewb #giveaway #RPBP

Parched (The Parched Series Book 1)
Available Now!
from author
Andrew C. Branham

The sun has become a ‘red giant’ and the world is hot and parched. In California, James and Lexie Deforio have three goals: to find food and water, to survive another day, and to protect their two children. When their home is abruptly robbed and burned to the ground, the family is forced to embark on a cross-country journey in search of safety and water.


Facing ruthless bandits, murderers, and some of the most extreme conditions they have ever encountered, they struggle to survive. When James is shot trying to help another family, Lexie and her children set out on a harrowing journey to save him. Finding temporary safety in the abandoned Ohio salt mines deep under Lake Erie, they appear to have found a new home. But, like everything on their journey, not all is as it seems.

 

Parched – a dystopian thriller by Andrew Branham V4


The sun no longer shone canary yellow. It hadn’t done so for years. Instead, it glared down, obstinate, punishing—beet red, like the garden tomatoes that no longer existed. It stood guard over the desert-dry water taps that had likewise fallen prey to the relentless heat, even in mid-October. Livermore, California had been a town set on rolling hills, swathed in green grass and fragrant orange poppies. Now, each day played out like the one before it: sun, heat, illness, death.

On that particular day, relative calm engulfed them. Only a few trails of smoke rose up in the distance toward the west and the Oakland Hills. Usually it was worse—the smoke was more like the dense cloud of marine fog that used to roll in daily. Now, the arid air, once fresh with coastal mist and the scent of eucalyptus trees mixed with wild lavender and rosemary, smelled like burning hay. The sun’s transition from an earthly asset to man’s most vicious foe had been going on for decades, but you would never have known it. It had caught humanity ill-prepared. Those who once had awaited its daily arrival now despised its very existence.

Scientists had a word for it; scientists had a word for everything. They called it a Red Giant, a star that had exhausted the supply of hydrogen at its core and had switched to thermonuclear fusion. As a result, the Earth found itself baking, its waters evaporating, and humanity’s extinction imminent. No scientist or politician could explain why the sun had made such a drastic transformation; nor did it matter.

In the distance, the sound of a laboring sixteen-wheeler lumbering up the road startled James as he popped up from his sleep. Scanning the room, he breathed out his relief. Everybody’s okay, he thought, checking out their California king bed. For a brief moment, he recalled his dream, in which he had been frolicking with his brother along the beaches of Lake Erie, near where they had grown up. But, instead of laughing, shouting, and swimming in cool waters, he was perspiring. Sweat soaked the bed and stained his shirt and underwear. His mouth felt and dry.

What’s the truck doing here at this hour?

The clanking of the massive tires hitting the potholes brought him back to reality. Rising cautiously, he kicked into the nightstand and let out a yelp, awakening their infant, who began to cry.

“What is it?” his wife asked.

“Nothing. Just the water truck. Go back to sleep.”

His thirteen-year-old son, Silas, was now awake as well and was scanning the room with his eyes. His long blond hair was matted down against his boyish face and, despite his sleep, he still looked extremely fatigued. He was irritated not only at the unrelenting heat and his sister’s cries, but also that he woke up in the same depressing room where they almost always stayed. Sometimes he hoped his life was just a nightmare that he would someday wake up from. Looking around, he saw walls stacked with cardboard boxes, dirty clothing on the floor, and dirt-stained sheets on the bed in which he was lying. The two windows in the room were covered in a thick film of dust and sand. A loaded rifle and handgun were on a box next to the bed.

“Can someone keep her quiet?” Silas grumbled as he looked toward his crying infant sister, Charlotte. “It’s impossible to sleep around here.”

Already dressed, James grabbed his shotgun and several plastic gallon water jugs, which he had strung together with nautical rope, and sprinted down the steps, the jugs thumping with each step. He pushed aside the heavy desk and chair he had used to barricade the door and scrunched down to peek out through a two-inch crack he had opened. He saw the truck that had stopped in the middle of the road. As he struggled to focus, he smelled the burning air and saw the heat waves reflecting off the cracked and buckled asphalt. He made out several residents emerging from their deteriorating town-homes, guns and jugs in hand, walking toward the truck with its distinctive Red Cross logo. The sound of his baby crying and the rustling of his waking family echoed through the empty stairwell.


Andrew Branham is an award winning writer and business executive who lives in Jackson, MI. Over the years, he has received several awards for his editorial columns and op-eds. His memoir, Anything for Amelia, has won multiple honors/awards.

He was born in the culturally rich and diverse town of Lorain,

 

Ohio. He is married and they have one daughter. Andrew is an avid writer and has contributed articles and op-eds for multiple major newspapers throughout the country. He also writes business articles for many different publications and websites.

Anything for Amelia is his first book and he was inspired to write it due to his extremely difficult adoption that many experts claimed was ‘the most difficult adoption in U.S. history’. Andrew found that writing in a journal each day during the adoption helped him to relieve the extreme levels of stress that he was facing. The journal proved to be the key to him writing the memoir. Andrew hopes that his book will help other adoptive families to avoid some of the mistakes that he made. In addition, he is donating a portion of any profits to the foster care system.

He has recently finished his first fiction novel, Parched (available 4/14/16). It is a post-apocalyptic/dystopian novel that is set in a time when the world has nearly run out of water. It follows a family as they attempt to cross the United States in search of food, water and shelter. He was inspired to write this novel while living through the extreme droughts of Northern California.

 

Giveaway #1
Giveaway #2
Purchase Parched for the special price of 
.99 cents and get “Anything for Amelia”
 for free!Email your proof of purchase to rukiapublishing@mail.com
This giveaway is limited to the first 10 receipts. First Come , First Serve! 
This is a fantastic prize- the ebook is listed at $7.99, but today you can get it free when you buy “Parched” for 
just
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Giveaway #3
Free Competition From Rukia Publishing!
Visit John Lock Publishing To Enter!
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Subscribe to Andrew’s Newsletter for updates! http://eepurl.com/bSqs41

Email (Andrew responds to all emails) drew.branham75@gmail.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drewanddjadoption

Linked In: www.linkedin-com/in/authorandrewbranham

Twitter: @AuthorAndrewB

 
 
 

“..the relentless pacing of this story, which rarely pauses from the action or relishes in the monotony of life after civilization’s breakdown, keeps the reader engaged throughout. By placing an entire family at the center of his novel, the author makes every challenge feel that much more dangerous. The book concludes with a brief excerpt from a forthcoming sequel, so hopefully readers can expect more adventures in Branham’s fearsome wasteland. A fast-paced post-apocalyptic tale of survival and family.” 

~Kirkus Reviews

 

****

“There is a constant urgency and energy in the writing that makes it difficult to put down. The most powerful parts of this story are when the lines of morality begin to blur in the family’s quest for survival. This resilient family always seems to be running away from something, narrowly escaping danger, and eking by to survive – it was exhausting just reading about their life on the run! At its core, Parched is about hope and survival against all odds, and the personal demons we must face when our bodies and minds are pushed to the limit. However, the underlying message is that the bonds of family, morality, and humanity can be bent, but never broken.”

~Self-Publishing Review.

 

****
“The story is taut and inventive and Branham makes some bold narrative choices, the stakes are high and no one is safe. With shifts in perspective each character is made sympathetic and three dimensional. PARCHED sets the stage for a suspenseful saga with well-crafted characters and numerous conflicts yet to be resolved.” ~Indie Reader
****

“Parched holds several surprises; not the least of which is its ultimate direction. Readers used to the typical linear progression of many apocalyptic reads will find something unique and special in Parched: highly recommended for any who want a powerful thriller with a strong environmental message.”

~Midwest Book Review—Diane Donovan, Editor/Senior Reviewer
 
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